How to Use A Pruning Saw

Once you’ve decided you need to make a pruning cut and know that the wood is too thick for the otherwise-preferable use of hand pruners or loppers, it’s time to get out your pruning saw. Pruning saws are your choice for wood about 1.5 inches thick or more and your last resort before the very large stuff that you might only be able to do with a chainsaw. As such, they are used to cut a wide range on the large end of wood thicknesses.

 

Since saws are used on thick, often long wood, their use often comes with more cautions and considerations than pruners and loppers, which are basically strong and specialized scissors. Saws can require significantly more strength and control.

 

This guide covers tips and cautions for the use of saws in pruning you can reach from ground level.

 

Pruning with A Saw, General Technique

Wear sturdy work gloves and possibly safety goggles if you’re in a dense shrub. Choose the exact spot to cut and a healthy cutting angle. As you prune, it may help to consider these steps:

 

  1. Notice nearby wood you want to preserve. Often you will be working in tight-angled crotches or near other branches you do not want to cut. More than any other pruning tool, saws easily slip and can quickly injure wood unintentionally, so note this risk in your mind.

 

  1. Choose a comfortable direction of cut. When possible, choose to cut from a top side to a lower side, so gravity is pulling the saw into the wood. By changing where you stand relative to the plant and the angle of your saw, you can usually make the same cut in many different ways to suit your access and comfort.

 

  1. Reduce limb weight with preliminary cuts. This step is crucial and not anticipated by many gardeners. Thick or long branches have significant weight that will cause a premature break and tear before you can complete a saw cut. This is because your saw cut will reduce the wood holding the limb to a weak, narrow strip. To prevent a tearing wound to the plant, you must tactically remove this weight before even starting your last cut at your chosen spot.

 

  1. Begin your final cut with a starting groove. Without this groove, the saw will want to slip away from your site. Slipping is especially a risk on non-horizontal branches.

 

  1. Begin to cut. Working in the groove to guide your strokes, you can cut at a brisk speed now, straight back and forth, keeping in enough control to not slip and wound nearby wood or yourself. Cutting happens on the pull stroke, so bite into the wood on pulling and push back lightly.

 

  1. Finish the cut. Saw until the branch comes cleanly away from the plant. Occasionally some rough wood will be left at the bottom of your cut, like a splinter beard. To achieve that perfect, baby-smooth cut, you can shave this off with a light stroke of your blade pressed flat against the pruning wound.

 

Other Tips and Cautions For Pruning Saw Use

  1. Work comfortable. Set your stance a little wide and plant firmly. Take long pull strokes when possible and pull with a lean of your body for major cuts or at least your whole arm, not just at the wrist and elbow. Conserving strength makes mistakes less likely and makes you a happier gardener.

 

  1. Keep the blade straight. If the blade flexes, you are applying to much pressure when you push it, or you are not pulling straight. Slow down. Apply pressure only on pulls. Get back to a straight, controlled cut and slowly increase your speed.

 

  1. Working near the ground? When working near the ground with any tool, try to keep the blade from getting into the soil. Sand and pebbles in the soil quickly dull any blade. You’ll have to do this a lot during renovation pruning, which involves making a lot of low cuts into the thick, old wood of prolific shrubs like lilac and beauty bush, for examples.

 

  1. Wear your saw in a holster on your belt. This is safe and handy and makes you feel pretty tough, too. Another approach by some is to use a folding pruning saw that can be carried in the pocket. I like these much less—they flex at the hinge under stress. The hinge also tends to collect sap or grit and rust.

 

  1. Clean your saw out before storing it. Tap the tool on dead wood to release most of the sawdust. Wipe sap and sawdust out of the teeth with clean burlap or other sturdy cloth. Storing tools dirty causes them to corrode and lose edge.

 

Chan Long Enterprise Co., Ltd. specializes in producing hand saws used in PVC plumbing, carpentry, interior decorating, making freight pallets and tree pruning. Blades are manufactured with high-carbon steel, which has been tested to Hardness Rockwell C (HRC) 52 degrees. The saw’s teeth have undergone impulse so that it has a hardness to HRC 63 degrees and thus 3-times the durability of regular saws.

 

Need more information about folding pruning saw or other hand saws, please don’t hesitate to contact with Chan Long. Best hand saw series all in here.

 

 

Article Source: https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-use-a-pruning-saw-3269519

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How to Choose the Best Pruning Saws before Buying?

If you’re looking to buy the best folding saw, you should first stop to consider exactly what you want to use it for.

 

There’s a wide range of very good folding saws available, from pruning saws, to Laplander and general survival folding saws that are great for camping and bushcraft. But, in this article, we only talk about how to choose pruning saws.

 

A Close Look at the Foldable Pruning Saw

 

As a keen gardener, your pruning saw will be an integral part of your tool kit. The fact you have found this page means you on the lookout for something a little more compact than a fixed blade pruning saw.

 

The safety and convenience of a folding hand saw is a big plus. It can be tucked neatly against the body when not in use, and the sharp edges are kept away from other surfaces such as your flesh or the skin and bark of the plants and tree.

 

Using a Folding Pruning Saw

 

Your pruning saw will generally be used to cut through branches from between 1/2 inch wide up to about 5 inches. Anything larger and you will want a chainsaw to do the work for you.

 

The great convenience of the folding pruning saw is the fact you are able to get into tight working areas with relative ease. When working within the matrix of a tree or shrub you will be able to saw in narrow gaps to remove a branch without damaging the others around it.

 

Blade Type and Material

 

When buying a folding pruning saw, it is important to think of the types of branches you aim to be cutting. The saws are designed with either a curved or a straight blade, and the common consensus is that curved blades are better for smaller branches while straight blades make easier work of thicker branches.

 

User Comfort and the Handle

 

The type of work you will be doing means it is important to consider user comfort. This generally comes from buying a tool that is well-balanced and has a superior designed handle that is easy to grip.

 

It is important to consider the size of your hand in accordance with the size of the saw. When buying online, where you will not necessarily have had the chance to hold the saw for yourself, search around for user opinion. Previous buyers will often comment if a saw is uncomfortable to use.

 

Lefty or Righty

 

The problem of left-handedness is common when it comes to garden hand tools. Folding saws can be susceptible to this due to the fact many will have an operable lock. Depending on the design, the operation of this may be inconvenient for left-handed uses. A control fitted on the top of the saw is generally the best option as this should be convenient for all operators.

 

You should also consider the fact that you may be wearing garden gloves when using the folding saw. Comfort and overall grip may be impaired as a result, although thin rubber gloves can mitigate any issues.

 

If you need more information about pruning saws, welcome to visit the website of Chan Long – the professional and experienced folding saw series manufacturer, providing various hand saws including pruning saws, pull saws, handy saw, woodworking saws and so on products. Feel free to send inquiry to us.

 

Article Source: http://www.sharpen-up.com/best-folding-saw-money-2016-review-roundup/

 

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How to Use a Tree Pruning Saw

Once you’ve decided you need to make a pruning cut and know that the wood is too thick for the otherwise-preferable use of hand pruners or loppers, it’s time to get out your tree pruning saw. Pruning saws are your choice for wood about 1.5 inches thick or more and your last resort before the very large stuff that you might only be able to do with a chainsaw. As such, they are used to cut a wide range on the large end of wood thicknesses.

 

Since saws are used on thick, often long wood, their use often comes with more cautions and considerations than pruners and loppers, which are basically strong and specialized scissors. Saws can require significantly more strength and control.

 

This guide covers tips and cautions for the use of saws in pruning you can reach from ground level.

 

Pruning with A Saw, General Technique

 

Wear sturdy work gloves and possibly safety goggles if you’re in a dense shrub.

 

Choose the exact spot to cut and a healthy cutting angle. As you prune, it may help to consider these steps:

 

  1. Notice nearby wood you want to preserve. Often you will be working in tight-angled crotches or near other branches you do not want to cut. More than any other pruning tool, saws easily slip and can quickly injure wood unintentionally, so note this risk in your mind.

 

  1. Choose a comfortable direction of cut. When possible, choose to cut from a top side to a lower side, so gravity is pulling the saw into the wood. By changing where you stand relative to the plant and the angle of your saw, you can usually make the same cut in many different ways to suit your access and comfort.

 

  1. Reduce limb weight with preliminary cuts. This step is crucial and not anticipated by many gardeners. Thick or long branches have significant weight that will cause a premature break and tear before you can complete a saw cut. This is because your saw cut will reduce the wood holding the limb to a weak, narrow strip. To prevent a tearing wound to the plant, you must tactically remove this weight before even starting your last cut at your chosen spot.

 

  1. Begin your final cut with a starting groove. Without this groove, tree pruning saws will want to slip away from your site. Slipping is especially a risk on non-horizontal branches.

 

  1. Begin to cut. Working in the groove to guide your strokes, you can cut at a brisk speed now, straight back and forth, keeping in enough control to not slip and wound nearby wood or yourself. Cutting happens on the pull stroke, so bite into the wood on pulling and push back lightly.

 

  1. Finish the cut. Saw until the branch comes cleanly away from the plant. Occasionally some rough wood will be left at the bottom of your cut, like a splinter beard. To achieve that perfect, baby-smooth cut, you can shave this off with a light stroke of your blade pressed flat against the pruning wound.

 

Chan Long is a professional hand saw manufacturer in the industry. We provide various saws such as tree pruning saw, folding saw, pull saw, woodworking saw and so on products. If you need more information about handy saw series, welcome to visit our website and feel free to contact Chan Long!

 

Article Source: http://treesandshrubs.about.com/od/pruning/a/How-to-Use-A-Pruning-Saw.htm

 

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